31-4 Commonly Misdiagnosed Syndromes of Low Back Pain

Letter from the Editor-in-Chief

The focus of DC Tracts’ final issue of the year is the diagnosis of low back pain...

The focus of D.C. Tracts’ final issue of the year is the diagnosis of low back pain – the most common complaint associated with chiropractic care. In this issue, the presenters outline both musculoskeletal and non-musculoskeletal sources of this problem.

The feature article by Dr. Sean Mathers, “Musculoskeletal Causes of Low Back Pain,” recaps for our readers the frequent sources of spinal pain including discogenic pain, Maignes syndrome, sacroiliac joint dysfunction, facet joint pain and spinal stenosis. In their audio lectures, Drs. Brynne Stainsby and Jacqueline Beres describe the non-musculoskeletal and discogenic origins of low back pain.

Dr. Brian Gleberzon’s Juris-Proofing section features part two of his series addressing the question, “What makes ‘informed consent’ truly informed?” Finally, Dr. Yasmeen Khan briefly outlines the scientific literature investigating lumbar disc herniations and uterine fibroids as a source of low back pain.

I trust that you will find this issue of D.C. Tracts both informative and interesting, and it will enrich both your clinical expertise and patient services.

Best Regards,
Bryan M. Bond, DC, MS, PhD
Editor-in-Chief

In This Issue:

  • FEATURE ARTICLE: Common Musculoskeletal Causes of Low Back Pain
    Sean Mathers, DC, DPT, DACRB
  • AUDIO LECTURES:
    • Non-Mechanical Causes of Low Back Pain
      Brynne Stainsby, DC
    • Discogenic Pain
      Jacqueline L. Beres, DC, cert-PSP, cert-MDT
  • JURIS-PROOFING: What Makes “Informed Consent” Truly Informed? (Part 2)
    Brian J. Gleberzon, DC, BA, MHSc, PhD
  • ABSTRACTS AND COMMENTARIES:
    Yasmeen A. Khan, DC, MS

    • Clinical Diagnostic Model for Sciatica Developed in Primary Care Patients with Low Back-Related Leg Pain
    • Common Diseases Mimicking Lumbar Disc Herniation and their Treatment
    • Uterine Fibroids: Diagnosis and Treatment
  • CONTINUING EDUCATION QUESTIONNAIRE

31-3 Functional and Clinical Neurology

Letter from the Editor-in-Chief

Welcome to the Functional and Clinical Neurology issue of D.C. Tracts! »

In this issue, our contributors review several interesting topics including multisensory myelopathy and central sensitization.

Dr. Brett Winchester’s Feature Article highlights how information from different sensory modalities may be integrated by the nervous system, and the considerable role of spinal manipulation, soft-tissue massage and rehabilitation in modulating dysfunctional afferent feedback.

Dr. Donald Murphy outlines the clinical relevance of cervical spine myelopathy, a common but at times overlooked source of neurological pain. He delivers an evidence-informed approach for managing myelopathy highlighting the importance of a thorough consultation and examination, along with a discussion of its appropriate management and careful monitoring.

In his Audio Lecture, Dr. Jeffrey Remsburg describes the pathophysiology behind nociception, including centrally-mediated pain or central sensitization. In addition, he provides clinical insights for managing chronic pain such as patient education, exercise and lifestyle changes.

Dr. Brian Gleberzon continues his Juris-Proofing series by exploring what constitutes “informed consent,” and Dr. Yasmeen Khan reviews the literature examining the effects of manual therapy on functional neurology.

I trust that you will find this issue of D.C. Tracts both informative and interesting, refining your clinical expertise and patient services.

Best Regards,
Bryan M. Bond, DC, MS, PhD
Editor-in-Chief

In This Issue:

  • FEATURE ARTICLE: Multisensory Integration in Chiropractic?
    Brett A. Winchester, DC
  • AUDIO LECTURES:
    • Cervical Myelopathy: An Increasingly Common Neurological Disorder in Chiropractic Practice
      Donald R. Murphy, DC, FRCC
    • Neurology of Pain and Clinical Applications Regarding Central Sensitization
      Jeffrey Remsburg, MS, DC, DACRB, Cert. MDT
  • JURIS-PROOFING: What Makes “Informed Consent” Truly Informed? (Part I)
    Brian J. Gleberzon, DC, BA, MHSc, PhD (Student)
  • ABSTRACTS AND COMMENTARIES:
    Yasmeen A. Khan, DC, MS

    • Unravelling Functional Neurology: A Critical Review of Clinical Research Articles on the Effect or Benefit of the Functional Neurology Approach
    • Subclinical Recurrent Neck Pain and its Treatment Impacts Motor Training-Induced Plasticity of the Cerebellum and Motor Cortex
    • Exergaming in a Moving Virtual World to Train Vestibular Functions and Gait: A Proof-of-Concept-Study with Older Adults
  • CONTINUING EDUCATION QUESTIONNAIRE

31-2 Thoracic Spine

Letter from the Editor-in-Chief

Welcome...

Welcome to the Summer 2019 issue of D.C. Tracts! In this issue, our contributors review the clinical consequences of thoracic spine pain. Although thoracic spine pain is a common clinical presentation, much of the scientific literature examining spinal conditions is focused on neck and low back pain, while the impact of thoracic spine pain on health and well-being seems generally overlooked.

This issue’s Feature Article provides an overview of thoracic spine pain, including the incidence/prevalence rates along with its health-burden and risk factors for thoracic impairments. In addition, it details the clinical significance of “red flags” and differential diagnoses for thoracic spinal conditions.

In his audio lecture, Dr. Patrick Battaglia delivers an in-depth analysis of the assessment of thoracic spine pain, including differentiating between specific and nonspecific causes of mid-back pain. He begins his lecture with a provocative quote from Dr. Nikolai Bogduk that explains that the understanding of thoracic spine pain, including its assessment and effective management, has scarcely advanced within the last century.

Dr. Adam Yoder’s lecture emphasizes evidence-informed management of thoracic spine pain, highlighting the role of exercise and manual therapy for managing thoracic conditions. More specifically, Dr. Yoder discusses the effectiveness of mobilization and manipulation as well as stabilization and strengthening exercises, along with the role of postural considerations.

In our abstracts and commentaries section, Dr. Yasmeen Khan highlights the role of chiropractic technique in the manual assessment of thoracic spine dysfunction, along with a case report emphasizing the importance of identifying warning signs and mindful diagnosis.

In addition, Dr. Gleberzon continues his Juris-Proofing discussion underscoring the role of patient communication, including the importance of complete disclosure of office policies and details related to patient management.

I trust that you will find this issue of D.C. Tracts both informative and interesting, and it will enrich both your clinical expertise and patient services.

Best Regards,
Bryan M. Bond, BSc, BS, DC, MS, PhD
Editor-in-Chief

In This Issue:

  • FEATURE ARTICLE: Thoracic Spine Pain: Is it a Significant Health Concern?
    Brian Bond, DC, MS, PhD
  • AUDIO LECTURES:
    • Differential Diagnosis and Evaluation of Thoracic Spine Pain
      Patrick J. Battaglia, DC, DACBR
    • Evidence-Based Treatment for Thoracic Spine Pain
      Adam Yoder, DPT
  • JURIS-PROOFING: Patient Communication
    Brian J. Gleberzon, DC, BA, MHSc, PhD (student)
  • ABSTRACTS AND COMMENTARIES:
    Yasmeen A. Khan, DC, MS

    • The Inter-Rater Reliability of Static Palpation of the Thoracic Spine for Eliciting Tenderness and Stiffness to Test for a Manipulable Lesion
    • Inter-Examiner Reliability of Seated Motion Palpation for the Stiffest Spinal Site
    • Metastatic Cancer of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Presenting as Mid- and Low Back Pain in a Long Distance Runner
  • CONTINUING EDUCATION QUESTIONNAIRE

31-1 Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

Welcome, Dr. Bryan Bond

D.C. Tracts would like to warmly welcome our new Editor-in-Chief, Dr. Bryan Bond, who has been an avid contributor over the years.

Dr. Bond received his BS in Kinesiology from the University of Waterloo in Ontario, and his BS in Human Biology and Doctor of Chiropractic degrees from the National University of Health Sciences. He has a master’s degree in Biomechanics from the University of Kansas and a PhD in Rehabilitation Science from the University of Kansas Medical Center.

He spent several years in private practice before joining Cleveland Chiropractic College in 2002. After ten years teaching at CCC, he accepted a full-time faculty position at the University of Saint Mary in Leavenworth, Kansas. He is currently a Professor of Biomechanics, Human Imaging and Musculoskeletal Assessment at USM and Co-Director of Research in the Department of Physical Therapy. He has presented post-graduate workshops for a number of state and national professional associations.

Dr. Bond’s experience will bring valuable insight to our publication, and we are excited to welcome him to the team.

Letter from the Editor-in-Chief

Welcome...

This issue of D.C. Tracts is a thorough, insightful review of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) related to their structural, functional, psychosocial and clinical characteristics. Considering TMD’s relatively high prevalence and significant financial burden, a comprehensive discussion of the clinical effects and conservative management is important.

In his lecture, Dr. Justin Hildebrand provides a brief overview of the anatomical and biomechanical considerations of TMD, as well as the clinical presentation and examination of the issue. He also shares some clinical insight for conservative management including modalities, soft-tissue massage and dry needling.

Dr. Christopher Kinslow lectures on the clinical relevance of TMD and the substantial cost of management. He further highlights the psychosocial factors associated with TMD such as stress, anxiety and depression, emphasizing the role of chiropractors in identifying risk factors and appropriately referring for co-management. Finally, he outlines the role of chiropractors in managing TMD through patient education, lifestyle recommendations and patient reassurance.

Dr. Bradley Muir’s feature article delivers an in-depth review of the anatomy and biomechanics of the temporomandibular joint. He outlines the functional and structural importance of the joint capsule, musculature, articular disc and ligaments, and conveys the importance of variations in normal resting jaw position.

I trust that you will find this issue of D.C. Tracts both informative and interesting, refining your clinical expertise and patient services.

Best regards,

Bryan M. Bond, BSc, BS, DC, MS, PhD
Editor-in-Chief

In This Issue:

  • FEATURE ARTICLE: Temporomandibular Joint: A Review of the Anatomy and Biomechanics
    Bradley J. Muir, DC, HBSc (Kin), DC, FRCCSS(C)
  • AUDIO LECTURES:
    • Temporomandibular Dysfunction (TMD)
      Justin Hildebrand, DC
    • Temporal Mandibular Dysfunction and Psychosocial Factors
      Christopher Kinslow, DC, DPT
  • JURIS-PROOFING: Introducing Juris-Proofing
    Brian J. Gleberzon, DC
  • ABSTRACTS AND COMMENTARIES:
    Yasmeen A. Khan, DC, MS

    • Resolution of Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction (TMJD) by Correcting a Lateral Head Translation Posture following Previous Failed Traditional Chiropractic Therapy: A CBP Case Report
    • Effectiveness of Mobilization of the Upper Cervical Region and Craniocervical Flexor Training on Orofacial Pain, Mandibular Function and Headache in Women with TMD. A Randomized, Controlled Study
    • Conservative Management of Temporomandibular Dysfunction: A Literature Review with Implications for Clinical Practice Guidelines (Narrative Review Part 2)
  • CONTINUING EDUCATION QUESTIONNAIRE